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Discover Athens

More than a city.

Athens is the historical capital of Europe, with a long history, dating from the first settlement in the Neolithic age. In the 5th Century BC (the “Golden Age of Pericles”) – the culmination of Athens’ long, fascinating history – the city’s values and civilization acquired a universal significance. Over the years, a multitude of conquerors occupied Athens, and erected unique, splendid monuments – a rare historical palimpsest. In 1834, it became the capital of the modern Greek state and in two centuries since it has become an attractive modern metropolis with unrivalled charm.

A large part of the town’s historic Centre has been converted into a 3-kilometre pedestrian zone (the largest in Europe), leading to the major archaeological sites (“archaeological park”), reconstructing – to a large degree – the ancient landscape.

Athens contribution to medicine

While medicine had been practiced in Babylon, China, India and Egypt, the Greeks were the first to create a standardized system of medicine including medical diagnosis, prognosis, and medical ethics. The manner in which the medical practice is carried out today, in terms of diagnosis and sometimes of treatment, is very similar to that of the ancient Greeks. These ancient advancements in medicine were largely instituted by Hippocrates, who is often called the “father of medicine.”

Aside from theories and ethics about how physicians should practice medicine, Hippocrates also made direct contributions to the application of medicine. He taught that all ailments had natural causes in a time when people believed that illnesses were punishments from the gods.


Acropolis Museum

Only 300m away from the sacred rock of Acropolis stands the impressive Acropolis Museum, one of the most important contemporary works of architecture in Athens. Beyond the obvious reason that it houses the treasures of the Acropolis, the museum has also consistently figured on lists of the world’s top 10 museums, both for its contents and its design.

Acropolis Museum

For more information visit: https://www.theacropolismuseum.gr/en

Museum of Cycladic Art

The Museum of Cycladic Art opened its doors to the public in January 1986. Today, over 3,000 artefacts of Cycladic, Ancient Greek and Cypriot art are on display on four floors, in the galleries of the Museum, a living cultural space in the heart of Athens. One of the Museum wings that hosts temporary exhibitions is the Stathatos Mansion (1 Irodotou & Vas. Sofias Ave), one of the best examples of neoclassical architecture in Athens, work of the Bavarian architect Ernest Ziller. A glass-covered passage connects Stathatos Mansion to the Permanent Collections building at 4 Neophytou Douka Str.

For further information visit: https://cycladic.gr/

Benaki Museum

The Benaki Museum, established and endowed in 1930 by Antonis Benakis in memory of his father Emmanuel Benakis, is housed in the Benakis family mansion in downtown Athens. The museum houses Greek works of art from the prehistorical to the modern times, an extensive collection of Asian art, hosts periodic exhibitions and maintains a state-of-the-art restoration and conservation workshop.

For further information visit: https://www.benaki.org/index.php?lang=en

The Byzantine and Christian Museum

The Byzantine and Christian Museum is situated at Vassilissis Sofias Avenue in Athens, Greece. It was founded in 1914, and houses more than 25,000 exhibits with rare collections of pictures, scriptures, frescoes, pottery, fabrics, manuscripts, and copies of artifacts from the 3rd century AD to the Late Middle Ages.

For more information about the Byzantine museum visit: https://www.byzantinemuseum.gr/en/

Getting Around Athens

Public Transport

Metro

Buses & Trolleybuses

Tram

Tickets for Public Transport

For more information about Athens and Greece visit:
http://www.visitgreece.gr/en/main_cities/athens
and
https://www.thisisathens.org/